Slingshot Factory Tour

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Slingshot Factory Tour

mattma
Administrator
If you can forgive the nationalism then the video has some good snippets of the way they do it in the factory.

http://www.thekiteboarder.com/2012/11/video-slingshot-boards-hand-built-in-the-usa/

Couple of things I noticed

They are gluing the cores with polyurethane glue ( the characteristic bubbling when it reacts with moisture in the air) and slicing with a narrow band saw. Presumably they then glue 2 halfwidth cores into one.

The shot of the rough cut on the band saw looks a lot like poured rails on that model.

Vacuum table to hold the cured boards on the table while it looks like the CNC does the final trim.

Can't work out what the wooden cases in the shape of the boards are. Looks too flimsy to be replacing a pneumatic presses. Post curing support for the boards?

Could see the presses anywhere. Anyone spot them?

Not sure made in USA means as much to anyone outside the US as it does to them. Did anyone else feel sick when they started to talk up USA skills? I wonder if turning inward like this is why they have lost so many riders lately ( Youri Zoon, Rueben Lenten, Andy yates!)

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Re: Slingshot Factory Tour

PeterJ
I used that type of glue to glue up my core on the board im almost done on, it's good stuff.

Interesting that they rout the board like that after it's finnished, has the rocker in it and all done. But you do see then using a band saw cutting one out as well.
Intersting that some have the contours on the bottom, id say they used the cnc to profile it first.
So they cut the rail, flip it and the profile the bottom.
Then press it , let it cure and rout out the shpe to an almost done board


Didnt see a press, id say they are hiding it.

They wouldnt need to worry about heat curing because they are full of hot air.
Peterj - Road to ride
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Re: Slingshot Factory Tour

downunder
PeterJ wrote
They wouldnt need to worry about heat curing because they are full of hot air.
Gold.
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Re: Slingshot Factory Tour

downunder
This post was updated on .


Heatbox 1:53...

Yey, 2:18, exactly what I'm doing

Gee, I need to watch this in a slow motion .

Hey, I'll be buying fins off them, they are sooo thin and strong.

And to be earnest, Slovakia hasn't got any sea or the Ocean near by. SS - take a chill pill


PS Checked the fins, $85 with delivery. No SS included. That's not too bad tho.
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Re: Slingshot Factory Tour

mattma
Administrator
Great video!

Couple of things that jumped out were

i) Screen printing graphics on to topsheet and not dye subing like I thought was the standard.
ii) Wetting the carbon out on a separate table and transferring to the board.
iii) Even the grown ups have to clean the f*#) rails up by hand
iv) Insert holes drilled with 2 hole radii so there's very little gap around the inserts. Squeezed them in to the holes through some FG.
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Re: Slingshot Factory Tour

downunder
mattma wrote
iii) Even the grown ups have to clean the f*#) rails up by hand
True, but I'm more and more thinking about the fixed router table and a flexible template. Not sure what to use as flexible material. The template would conform nicelly to the board rocker, and one pass on the router would do the job. Current work is 2hrs + for the rails.

But FG is a killer for sharp tools

mattma wrote
iv) Insert holes drilled with 2 hole radii so there's very little gap around the inserts. Squeezed them in to the holes through some FG.

Oh, yes...One fastener bit for the insert plate + one slightly bigger hole than the insert "neck".

FG diagonally cut 5x5 cm and thread split (not cut), for insert to go through. Impossible to see after glassing.

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Re: Slingshot Factory Tour

mattma
Administrator
" True, but I'm more and more thinking about the fixed router table and a flexible template. Not sure what to use as flexible material. The template would conform nicelly to the board rocker, and one pass on the router would do the job. Current work is 2hrs + for the rails. "


That final trim is the part I dislike the most. So much dust, even with long sleeves I still end up getting the FG on me and scratch for hours afterwards.

There is a video on the video tab of the blog where they are making skate boards and the final trim they do they have a very stiff template and rely on the flexibility of the deck to flatten against the template. Then they they use a router table (peter had the proper name for it which I can't remember now) with a round guide on it and get the router to take off the excess.

I'm not sure how you get you're outlines onto the core material but I am still using 18mm MDF to guide the router and so I am thinking that I can use it again to trim the board at the end. Although the template is 10mm smaller than the rail outline, a think a guide on the router table that is the same radius as the router bit and positioned so that its 10mm further out than the cutting edge of the router bit will work.

I have noticed that 40grit sandpaper eats through the glass and wood. If it were possible use the sander in place of the router somehow and connect a vacuum cleaner to it then that might be cheaper because as you pointed out epoxy and FG kills router bits.

The other idea that I've got in the mix is the brokite mould idea. They don't have excess core material on the outside of the rails. That role is played by 2 plastic pieces that fit snuggly against the rails. They wax them up and at the end of the curing they knock them out with the hammer so that it is only the laminate layers on the top and bottom with no core material to bond to. When I tried it, it was possible just to cut the excess glass off with scissors ( I got a $15 pair of tungsten blade scissor from Bunnings) and it only took a few minutes with a sanding block and 40 grit then wet and dry to bring the rails out.